Expert Author Showcase: Bruce Hoag

Meet EzineArticles’ Expert Author Bruce Hoag in Today’s Showcase

Expert Author Bruce Hoag’s work as a psychologist and business mentor has provided him great entrepreneurial insight. As a Ph.D. graduate of the Manchester Business School’s Organizational Psychology program, Bruce assists others in building their own online business to adapt in a rapidly changing business world.

Utilizing article writing as his primary marketing strategy to build exposure for his publications, Bruce has cultivated several writing insights that have led to his success. Confessing if he could start over again, he said he would follow his own advice he prescribes others: “Write every day,” he recommended. “The more you do it, the better you’ll get at it … I know how many articles I want to write each day, and that’s the first thing on my agenda.”

Targeting a burgeoning audience of those who want to understand change and how to adapt to it, Bruce asks questions others don’t. “My favorites are ‘why?’ and ‘who cares?'” Bruce stated. “I make sure that I’ve answered at least one of them in every article I write.” In addition to answering these difficult questions, Bruce strives to provide concrete value to readers to withstand the host of what he refers to as “useless content on the Internet.”

Bruce’s Methodology to Common Article Writing Challenges

  • Unique Titles – Although I have used titles such as “3 ways to do this” or “5 ways to do that,” I prefer to use some creativity that will attract the reader’s attention.
     
  • Audience Reach – This is still a challenge, but one approach is to choose better keywords. It’s easy to forget that the words I use will be searched for by people outside of my niche, as well as inside it.
     
  • Finding Motivation – Finding the motivation to write isn’t usually a problem for two reasons. 1) I enjoy writing; and 2) There’s so much that I want other people to think about. The inspiration comes from many sources: current events, articles, magazines, ezines, books, conversations, etc.
     
  • Writer’s Block – Like many writers, I often use prompts. This can be just about anything. Some books for writers will describe short scenes, and then ask you to write about a particular character or from a different point of view. Anything that gets you to start writing, whether it’s good, bad, or indifferent, will prime the writing pump.

Try Bruce’s methods by asking yourself the questions no one else in your niche dares ask: “Why?” and “Who cares?” In doing so, not only will you build your exposure, you will provide more value and begin to be more confident in your efforts!

Do you have a question or comment for Bruce? Feel free to leave it in the comments section below.

44 Comments »


1

Nice to meet you Mr Bruce Hoag!

Comment provided July 19, 2012 at 9:34 AM

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2
Jean Buschke writes:

“Write every day.” I am posting it all over my house :) It how things get done. Thank you!

Comment provided July 19, 2012 at 9:47 AM

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Bruce Hoag writes:

Hi Jean,

Thanks for your comments.

I remember reading somewhere that the best way to get your writing done is to set aside a period of time, at the same time everyday.

I know that life can get in the way sometimes, but you’d be surprised how many great novels were written this way.

So, press on, and you’ll get the writing done that you want to do!

Cheers, Bruce

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3
Terry Chestnutt writes:

Hi, Mr. Hoag. What is the main idea behind the business psychology you apply? What do you mainly look for when accessing the situation to see how to proceed? What is the main thing? Thanks. I don’t know exactly what business psychology is and would like to have some idea.

Comment provided July 19, 2012 at 10:31 AM

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Bruce Hoag writes:

Dear Terry,

Apologies for taking so long to reply.

Psychology is about why people act the way they do. So business psychology is about why entrepreneurs and their customers act the way they do.

When I teach people how to set up their own online businesses, I show them how to view their products and their market from the perspective of their buyers.

Those who don’t use psychology emphasize benefits over features. To me, this is putting the cart before the horse. Until you understand the “why” the what won’t make much sense.

Cheers, Bruce

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Terry Chestnutt writes:

Thanks. All the most successful copywriters I have read-world famous for their success, say after knowing everything there is to know about your product you must know everything there is about your prospective buyer. These are the two main things-the unique characteristics of your product and how they relate to the unique buyer. You must connect the two, especially on the emotional buying triggers level. You are completely correct according to those guys.

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Bruce Hoag writes:

Hi Terry,

In my opinion, I don’t think it’s possible to know everything there is to know about your niche, market or prospects. For one thing it’s too complicated and for another, all of that keeps changing.

But, you can learn about people, why they buy when they do, and how to get your products in front of them.

I should say straightaway that I’m dead set against any form of manipulation. I will err on the side of caution lest I accidentally deceive people into buying. It’s one of the things that I detest in much of what passes for online marketing.

But, I believe that the product that we have to offer is superior to anything on the Web; and sometimes you have to remind people of the frustration they’ve felt about not being able to solve their particular problem. Otherwise they won’t feel the need to get the solution when it’s presented to them.

Cheers, Bruce

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Terry Chestnutt writes:

Yes, Bruce, my description is a bit of an exaggeration for emphasis. You can’t literally know everything about anything. But as you say you need to know your prospect very well and your product as it relates to your prospect very well , particularly why it appeals to his emotions in a way that he will likely buy it. Sorry for the poor explanation. I hope this is a little clearer.

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4

Congratulations, Bruce! You deserve this recognition for the excellent work you do.

Connie Ragen Green

Comment provided July 19, 2012 at 10:38 AM

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Bruce Hoag writes:

Dear Connie,

Many thanks for writing. You, too, provided me with some early encouragement!

Cheers, Bruce

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5
Sonia Poehlein writes:

Great points! I have trouble with keywords – knowing how to use them and which words to use. Do I choose only the ones I use for my website? How do keywords that are not in my “meta list” work to help people find me? This ties in with “Audience Reach” – how do you step out of your “niche words” to find folks outside of your niche?

Comment provided July 19, 2012 at 10:52 AM

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Bruce Hoag writes:

Hi Sonia,

You ask some great questions!

Remember that your keywords should attract readers who search on them in their favorite search engine.

Ezines provides some suggestions for you. I usually choose those that are consistent with my niche and represent a key point in the article.

I don’t think that Google pays a lot of attention anymore to your meta list, so I would ignore this.

Also, you should concentrate on your niche. Most people do not dig as deep into theirs as they should.

Cheers, Bruce

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6
Tintu KM writes:

Very good tips are these.
Really informative tips to follow and since these would be from a professional like Bruce Hoag it makes it even better.
I’m glad that I found Bruce Hoag.
Looking forward to more.

Comment provided July 19, 2012 at 12:04 PM

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7
Opal writes:

Sonia, your questions are some I keep asking. In addition to Bruce’s urging writers to write daily, I think a good writer will keep refreshing ideas in reach when he/she reads good material, which includes periodicals, magazines, good books, fiction or fact. I also like to research and have learned so much from it. That includes reading and the wonderful internet containing so much informatrion.

Comment provided July 19, 2012 at 2:39 PM

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8
Randall Magwood writes:

Hi Bruce. Congrats on the publicity. Finding the motivation to write isn’t a problem for me either. Glad you were able to share your insights.

Comment provided July 19, 2012 at 4:37 PM

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9
David Whaley writes:

Hi Mr. Bruce Hoag. Thank you for sharing some of your writing skills. I look forward to reading more from you.

Comment provided July 19, 2012 at 9:51 PM

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10
Vijay Mishra writes:

Yes, Bruce Hoag is a great outhaer.

Comment provided July 20, 2012 at 12:14 AM

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11
Joseph Dabon writes:

So what else is new? Or the secret? Nothing except that Mr. Hoag enjoys writing while I enjoy goofing.

Comment provided July 20, 2012 at 1:53 AM

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Bruce Hoag writes:

Nothing wrong with goofing. It just depends on what your goals are: why you write, and what you write about.

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12
VMM Milic writes:

Write every day!

Thank you for sharing, everyone can benefit from this.

Comment provided July 20, 2012 at 9:15 AM

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13
Patrick Regoniel writes:

It’s great to get some insights from Bruce experience. Thanks.

Comment provided July 20, 2012 at 4:17 PM

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14

Bruce,
It is so true that when I write regularly, the thoughts flow more easily and it helps me to write more. I also use other articles, current events, discussions with friends or clients, as grist for the mill of writing. There are an endless number of topics and many different perspectives for each.

Dr. Erica

Comment provided July 22, 2012 at 10:27 PM

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Bruce Hoag writes:

Dear Dr Erica,

Many thanks for your comments.

I’m sure that they will encourage others to keep writing.

Cheers, Bruce

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15
Opal Marrs writes:

In this most interesting discussion Mr. Hoag mentions that one must know one’s product and his prospect or at least as much as it is possible to do so. I suggest that it is important also to know the products of your competitor
Sometimes it seems that some of the article writers are writing to get traffic to their web sites in order to sell a service or a product. Nothing wrong with that, but what if your articles were your product? Hope I make sense.

Comment provided July 23, 2012 at 5:55 PM

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Terry Chestnutt writes:

Hi Opal Marrs. It is common for articles (Content) to be the product. Send your readers to a squeeze page where additional content on a very attractive and specific topic is offered for an email address to send more free content to. Along with the content send links to supplies needed to implement the protocol described in the free content, if it is that kind of protocol, or send for pay content on a needed aspect of the subject, or send an affiliate link to someone elses clickbank content sales page, for example, and earn commissions on the sales. Those are some general ideas. The important thing at the start is a good compelling offer of free content at an attractive, user friendly squeeze page.

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16
Joseph Dabon writes:

There is no surer way of getting bogged down in details than to know everything about something.

I suggest we take a refuge in the fact that online business, unlike the traditional kind, allows us to reach as many people as possible. In this respect, the theory of numbers is in our favor.

In a boxing match, the fighter who threw the most number of punches has a higher probability of winning.

Comment provided July 23, 2012 at 7:30 PM

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Bruce Hoag writes:

The only punches that count are the ones that hit the opponent.

That’s another way of saying that you can be busy, but accomplish very little.

You’ll accomplish a lot more if focus your time an energy.

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17
Joseph Dabon writes:

I think it is worth keeping in mind that article writing is a different animal compared to copywriting.

Thought both can be zeroed in on a specific niche, preferably so, copywriting goes beyond that. It is writing sales pitch for somebody, for a product or for you. That being the case, it cannot be a generalist like most articles are.

Comment provided July 23, 2012 at 7:39 PM

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Terry Chestnutt writes:

Yes, like you say, they are two different things. The difference you point out is good to keep in mind, now that you mention it. But I did not mean to detract from Mr. Hoag’s featured writer spot here. I just sort of got caught up in the topic that somehow happened and lost site of things.Sorry, Bruce. Not intentional.

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Bruce Hoag writes:

Hi Joseph,

I agree with you that many articles are written in a generalist sort of way.

But, there are some that are very specific and, for me, anyway, they’re usually the best. I try to write mine like that without making them excessively long. LOL

Cheers, Bruce

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18
Bruce Hoag writes:

Not a problem, Terry.

I just wanted to comment on something that Opal said about articles being products.

Personally, I don’t agree with this idea. To me, an individual article is a means to an end. It’s not just information, but it’s also marketing.

A collection of articles might make a nice free product, but one article is only that: an article.

Comment provided July 24, 2012 at 4:34 AM

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Terry Chestnutt writes:

I started wondering if Opal has considered consulting. Article marketing seems like a good vehicle for a consultant. Do you agree, Mr. Hoag?

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19
Bruce Hoag writes:

Please call me Bruce.

Article marketing can be very effective for any profession; but it’s especially useful for those with online businesses.

You have to give before you can ever expect to get; and articles are the perfect way to do that.

Comment provided July 24, 2012 at 5:30 AM

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Terry Chestnutt writes:

OK, Bruce. You started to say we must understand why our prospect buys? Is there some mysterious psychological aspect to it? And what else do we need to know about him in general? I know you said something about understanding the reader? Thanks.

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Bruce Hoag writes:

We’re complicated creatures, so nothing is absolutely cut and dried. But, the majority of people buy with their hearts, and then justify the purchase with their heads. A lot of people disagree with this, but that doesn’t change the fact that they do.

You’ll find a lot of internet marketers who will use this to manipulate the emotions of their prospects in an effort to get them to buy. For example, suggesting that there’s not enough product to go around, when in fact there’s plenty. Things like that.

The balance is that unless prospects are reminded of what it feels like to have the unmet need, they won’t buy. And if they’re not thinking about your product when they are offered it, they won’t remember what it feel like.

It’s only when the remember the “pain” of having the problem that they’ll consider your solution.

Cheers, Bruce

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Terry Chestnutt writes:

Bravo! Well said! Thanks.

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Terry Chestnutt writes:

We would consider, then, this beat-the-pain element when picking a niche, right?

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Bruce Hoag writes:

When you pick a niche, always go for one where money is already being spent. This is counterintuitive. Most people reason that they should look for a niche where they’re the only ones. But, if no one is spending money in that niche, then there must be a very good reason.

So, when you think about a niche, start with a problem that people are trying to solve.

Here are a couple of articles that might be helpful. I hope that the links work. Ezines & I are trying to understand why they don’t when they’re plugged into an email.

http://ezinearticles.com/?Choosing-a-Niche-When-Theyre-All-Taken&id=7074351

http://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Start-a-Business-When-You-Dont-Know-Where-to-Start&id=7074324

http://ezinearticles.com/?Anyone-Can-Have-an-Online-Business&id=7135389

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20
Joaseph Dabon writes:

Nothing wrong with goofing except the gut feeling that the time spent doing nothing could have been used to write, at least, a paragraph about something.

Comment provided July 24, 2012 at 7:15 AM

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Bruce Hoag writes:

You’re right about the need to spend some time writing.

One obstacle that people face is that their day gets interrupted and instead of writing or even outlining for 15 minutes, they put off the entire exercise until the following day “when they have more time.”

Then the next day, they get interrupted again, and the same thing happens.

If you write for 15 minutes each day, M-S, that’s 90 minutes in a week. Think what you could accomplish in that amount of time!

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21
Joseph Dabon writes:

The courage to carve out their own destinies.

We know that our life is the product of our choices. Making the right choices to live meaningful lives is what ties most of us down.

Comment provided July 25, 2012 at 7:40 PM

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Bruce Hoag writes:

Do you feel tied down? How could you achieve what you want to while having the freedom you desire?

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22

Congrats on the publicity dear Bruce Hoag.

Comment provided October 22, 2012 at 9:29 PM

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Bruce Hoag writes:

Many thanks Christinia!

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