The Rules of Capitalization

Uppercase or Lowercase? Learn the Case!

The definition of capitalization is fairly simple. It’s the practice of making certain letters uppercase, or capitalized, when needed. Knowing when to use proper capitalization isn’t as simple, especially for non-native English writers.

When it comes to capitalization, it’s important to use the correct case because it lends to your credibility as a writer. If an article contains excessive capitalized words in unnecessary situations, it will send a message of inexperience to the reader. If a brand or proper name isn’t capitalized, it could send a message of disregard for the lack of attention to detail. Bottom line, it’s essential to use the correct case!

If you’re unsure of when to use capitalization in your writing, review the rules and examples below to give you a better idea.

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Top Misused Words Part IX

Happy Birthday, Noah Webster!

In 1828, at the age of 70, Noah Webster published An American Dictionary of the English Language. He hoped to help children in overcrowded schools better articulate themselves and standardize American speech. Born on October 16, 1758, Webster is now known as the Father of the American Dictionary. 255 years later, Webster’s birthday is celebrated by thousands on “Dictionary Day.”*

It’s with great pleasure that we dedicate this edition of the Top Misused Words to Webster and to all who are passionate about language.
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Top Misused Words Part VIII

If something doesn’t sit well with you, will you be able to set aside your feelings?

If your brother turned into a frog, should you turn him in to your parents? Does the principal establish the principle of the thing? And frankly, is every supermarket Express Line wrong?

We’re back again with the next 5 most commonly misused words in the English language and we’re tackling some tough phrases that can be incredibly confusing. Without further delay, here they are!

Fewer vs. Less

fewer – Used with count nouns (nouns that can be pluralized when needed), fewer is a quantifier indicating “a smaller number of.”

Incorrect: Yellow Express Lane: 10 Items or Less
Correct: Yellow Express Lane: 10 Items or Fewer
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Top Misused Words Part VII

Would You Back up the Backup?

In this edition of the Top Misused Words series, we are exploring the difference a space can make in changing a word’s usage and even its meaning.

When in doubt, consider whether it’s a noun or a verb. You will find nouns typically occur without a space and verbs will typically maintain a space. However, as with everything in the English language, there are always exceptions.

Without further ado, keep an eye out for these commonly misused words in your article writing!
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Top Misused Words Part VI

If he formerly stepped down, does that mean he never stepped down, or he stepped down in the past and now he has resumed his position as CEO?

Even the most adept Expert Authors will make grammar mistakes because of distractions. However, there is also another phenomenon that occurs – too much focus! Such strenuous focus on one area may be causing your brain to filter out incoming information, which may be causing some errors to hide in plain sight.

What’s the remedy? Give your brain one task at a time to focus by writing in stages:

  1. Outline (Everything you need to say)
  2. Draft (Flesh out the outline)
  3. Edit (Add/Remove content)
  4. Proofread (Search for grammar errors)

What should you be looking for? Aside from misspelled words, run-on sentences, and the usual suspects, keep an eye out for these commonly misused words.
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Top Misused Words Part V

Bear these tips in mind to avoid the bear baring his teeth. Don’t know which bear? It’s the one bearing the bared tray.

Much of language is learned through hearing and practice – through conversation. We rely on context to give meaning, but what happens when we’re led astray by what we hear?

Misused words and poor grammar.

No problem – we’ve got the remedy! Discover the true meaning and maintain a keen eye on your articles for this batch of misused words:

e.g. vs. i.e.

e.g. – Latin abbreviation for “exempli gratia,” which means “for example.” Use this abbreviation when providing a list of examples that are not a part of a finite series.

Incorrect: Greg is a huge fan of cyborgs, i.e., the Terminator, Inspector Gadget, and RoboCop.
Correct: Greg is a huge fan of cyborgs, e.g., the Terminator, Inspector Gadget, and RoboCop.
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Top Misused Words Part IV

Freight Night – All of Your Fears Shipped First Class!

Welcome back for another round of the top misused words in the English language, but first – let’s talk proofreading.

It’s not the most glamorous part of article writing, but having a thoroughly proofread (and appropriately edited) article can make you look glamorous – or at least maintain your credibility. Keep your readers positively focused on you, instead of negatively focused on errors, by proofreading your articles…

…and don’t forget these 5 most misused words in the English language:

Fright vs. Freight

fright – A sudden intense feeling of fear; an experience that causes someone to feel fear suddenly.

Incorrect: Horror movies give me a freight!
Correct: Horror movies give me a fright!

freight – Goods transported (or to transport goods) in bulk by truck, train, ship, or aircraft.

Incorrect: That ship carries fright rather than passengers.
Correct: That ship carries freight rather than passengers.
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Top Misused Words Part III

Top Whether Authority Predicts Fare Skies with Intermittent Flashes of Lighting

We’re back again with the next 5 most commonly misused words in the English language.

Before we jump in, imagine you’ve painted the walls of a room. How long do you wait before hanging curtains and artwork or moving furniture against the wall? Until the paint has dried, right? That way, you can easily see areas that need touch-ups and you don’t run the risk of doing more harm than good.

Proofreading is similar to painting. After writing your article, let the “ink” dry before you proofread by walking away from the article for a while. This ensures you have given yourself enough space to proofread with a fresh perspective. Try it out and discover how this strategy actually saves time and maintains your credibility!

Here are the next 5 most misused words in the English language:
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Top Misused Words Part II

Don’t Lose Your Credibility by Misusing These Words, Too!

We’re back again with your next installment of the most commonly misused words in the English language. Our last edition certainly struck a chord with many authors as we listed some of your biggest pet peeves or offered points of grammatical clarification.

Let’s take a moment to discuss what happens when an error does see the light of day. It’s always a humbling moment when, as an Expert Author, someone points out grammatical errors or inconsistencies in your published articles or on your site. Use these errors as moments of discovery by adding them to your proofreading lineup to strengthen your writing skills and maintain your credibility as an Expert Author.

Without further ado, keep a vigilant eye on your articles for this next batch of abused, ill-used, and misused words:

affect vs. effect

affect – To have an effect on; make a difference to; an emotion or desire.

Incorrect: Chocolate effects my behavior.
Correct: Chocolate affects my behavior.

effect – To bring about; to cause something to happen; a change that is a result of an action or cause.

Incorrect: Chocolate has an incredible affect on behavior.
Correct: Chocolate has an incredible effect on behavior.
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Top Misused Words of the English Language

Don’t Lose Your Credibility by Misusing These Words!

By Expert Author demand, we collected some of the most misused words of the English language. From our data reports to your biggest pet peeves, here are the 5 most misused words to add to your article proofreading lineup. Strengthen your writing skills and maintain your credibility as an Expert Author by ensuring these errors never see the light of day again!

Lose vs. Loose

lose – To be deprived of or cease to have; to cause someone to fail to gain or retain something.

Incorrect: Loose weight in 5 weeks or loose your chance to go to the beach!
Correct: Lose weight in 5 weeks or lose your chance to go to the beach!

loose – Not firmly or tightly fixed in place; to release or set free.

Incorrect: The dog’s collar was lose, so Bob tightened it before the dog got lose.
Correct: The dog’s collar was loose, so Bob tightened it before the dog got loose.
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