Top Misused Words Part III

Top Whether Authority Predicts Fare Skies with Intermittent Flashes of Lighting

We’re back again with the next 5 most commonly misused words in the English language.

Before we jump in, imagine you’ve painted the walls of a room. How long do you wait before hanging curtains and artwork or moving furniture against the wall? Until the paint has dried, right? That way, you can easily see areas that need touch-ups and you don’t run the risk of doing more harm than good.

Proofreading is similar to painting. After writing your article, let the “ink” dry before you proofread by walking away from the article for a while. This ensures you have given yourself enough space to proofread with a fresh perspective. Try it out and discover how this strategy actually saves time and maintains your credibility!

Here are the next 5 most misused words in the English language:
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Top Misused Words Part II

Don’t Lose Your Credibility by Misusing These Words, Too!

We’re back again with your next installment of the most commonly misused words in the English language. Our last edition certainly struck a chord with many authors as we listed some of your biggest pet peeves or offered points of grammatical clarification.

Let’s take a moment to discuss what happens when an error does see the light of day. It’s always a humbling moment when, as an Expert Author, someone points out grammatical errors or inconsistencies in your published articles or on your site. Use these errors as moments of discovery by adding them to your proofreading lineup to strengthen your writing skills and maintain your credibility as an Expert Author.

Without further ado, keep a vigilant eye on your articles for this next batch of abused, ill-used, and misused words:

affect vs. effect

affect – To have an effect on; make a difference to; an emotion or desire.

Incorrect: Chocolate effects my behavior.
Correct: Chocolate affects my behavior.

effect – To bring about; to cause something to happen; a change that is a result of an action or cause.

Incorrect: Chocolate has an incredible affect on behavior.
Correct: Chocolate has an incredible effect on behavior.
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Top Misused Words of the English Language

Don’t Lose Your Credibility by Misusing These Words!

By Expert Author demand, we collected some of the most misused words of the English language. From our data reports to your biggest pet peeves, here are the 5 most misused words to add to your article proofreading lineup. Strengthen your writing skills and maintain your credibility as an Expert Author by ensuring these errors never see the light of day again!

Lose vs. Loose

lose – To be deprived of or cease to have; to cause someone to fail to gain or retain something.

Incorrect: Loose weight in 5 weeks or loose your chance to go to the beach!
Correct: Lose weight in 5 weeks or lose your chance to go to the beach!

loose – Not firmly or tightly fixed in place; to release or set free.

Incorrect: The dog’s collar was lose, so Bob tightened it before the dog got lose.
Correct: The dog’s collar was loose, so Bob tightened it before the dog got loose.
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Top Spelling Blunders Part IV

Whoops! Make that “The Last Set of Knives…”

It’s that time again! So far we’ve covered 15 spelling keys in the Top Spelling Blunders series. Why? To help you strengthen your article writing skills by avoiding glaring errors that could lower your credibility!

Let’s kick off this next batch of the most common spelling blunders with this proofreading tip: Catch those pesky errors by changing your perspective or proofreading environment. Change your font, read from the bottom-up, change your screen size, etc. This will help you focus on areas of your writing that you may unknowingly skip over.

Without further ado, here are your next 5 spelling blunders to include in your proofreading checklist to strengthen your article writing skills.

Thier vs. Their

Remember that rule “I” before “E” except after “C”? When it comes to the word their, throw that rule right out the window. Their is the possessive form of they, which is used before a noun. It can also be used to replace his or her.

Example: Their home is just around the corner.
Example: John forgot his lunch. Susie forgot her lunch. They forgot their lunch.
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Top Spelling Blunders Part III

A Little Practice Will Take Your Efforts a Long Way

Your ability to communicate with your audience will give your credibility an incredible boost, strengthen your efforts online and offline, as well as afford you the freedom to concentrate your energy elsewhere.

A critical piece of communication is using correct spelling and good grammar. This will ensure you maintain your reader’s attention on you and your topic.

You may consider investing in a spellchecker, finding a proofreader, or enrolling in an English Grammar course. Whatever you choose to do, you can rely on getting spelling and grammar tips right here.

So let’s get to it: Here are your next 5 spelling blunders to include in your proofreading checklist to strengthen your article writing skills.
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Top Spelling Blunders Part II

It’s spreading! Run for your grammatical lives!

While emoticons and text-speak have their place in the instant messaging world (e.g. LOL b4 u go dont u hve 2 rite ur arcles? :P), readers don’t warm-up to it in articles.

Good grammar and correct spelling are paramount to your success as a credible author. That’s why we collected the most common spelling mistakes in order to help you maintain your credibility and build confidence in your writing skills.

Let’s get to it: Here are your next 5 spelling blunders you can include in your proofreading checklist to assure your credibility is untarnished!
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Top Spelling Blunders

Increase Your Credibility by Watching Out for These Commonly Misspelled Words

Grab your dictionaries and flip on your spell-checkers, because we are in for one exciting ride! We recently collected the most common spelling mistakes even the most credible expert authors make.

Over the course of the next few weeks, we will present these pesky misspellings to you in order to help you maintain your credibility and build confidence in your writing skills. Without further ado, we give you: The Top 5 Spelling Blunders!

Loosing vs. Losing

Loosing is the number one, most prevailing spelling blunder! It often occurs when the author intended to use the present participle of the word lose, as in losing weight and mistakenly adds a second o. The root of this blunder stems from the confusion between the words: lose and loose.

Here’s the difference: Lose means loss and loose means something is, or has been, released (or something not firmly held in place).

Example: Sam tightened his loose belt after losing weight.

Key: What do winning and losing have in common? Both have only two vowels (winning = ii, losing = oi).
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