Pre-Tweeting Your Articles

Launch Strategy + Twitter = More Traffic

No, “pre-tweeting” is not what Tweety Bird does to his stained clothing…

Pre-tweeting simply means using Twitter to tell your audience about the article you are currently writing in order to build anticipation and desire for the finished product. Think about it – your article is a product of sorts, isn’t it? Well, this technique mimics the common product launch strategy of creating hype for a product prior to the actual release date.

Pre-tweeting accomplishes several things:

  • Helps you define your audience and topic early
  • Forces you to actually submit the article in a timely manner
  • Demonstrates your forethought and planning, which builds credibility
  • Gives you a legitimate reason to contact your market one more time per article
  • Builds the perceived value of your articles
  • Primes your audience for what’s coming down the pipe

This is a surprisingly powerful and elegant method of increasing your readership, credibility and value to your niche without investing a lot of time or effort.

So if you’re on Twitter, why not make this part of your tweeting routine? You’ll find the benefits far outweigh the (30) seconds per article you’ll spend doing it.

14 Comments »


1
Joel Wesseldyke writes:

Brilliant. Why are the best tips always based on common sense and so easily overlooked?

Comment provided March 20, 2009 at 9:38 AM

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2
Brian writes:

I like it! Thanks for these constant tips. I have already scheduled all of next week at “article submission week,” and intend to finally get my first 25 articles in.
Thanks again for the encouragement.

Brian (a.k.a. Professor Homunculus) at Math Mojo Chronicles.com

Comment provided March 20, 2009 at 10:15 AM

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3

Is there any way you can auto tweet different articles to different tweet accounts? If I am writing for multiple industries, it helps if this is enabled.

Comment provided March 20, 2009 at 4:19 PM

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4

Does Pre-Tweeting come in liquid or powder?
Is it colorfast?
My pet is quite particular.
His name is Wingman, and usually just parades aound in the buff, happy with dropping his tweets on a newspaper.

Just kidding!
I think your idea is great!!!
I will surely give it a try.

Comment provided March 20, 2009 at 5:56 PM

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5

Takuya,

We have this problem solved for one type of situation, but not the other.

Many members who write about diverse areas or completely unrelated niches will segment their articles under variations of their name.

Example:

Christopher Knight – writes about article writing.
Chris Knight – writes about self help.
C. Michael Knight – writes about trans ams.

Yet, they are all the same person.

Our system is setup to allow you to have 1 auto-tweet account per author name.

Quite frankly, we’re not sure how to set it up to suit your needs unless you already segment your niches by different variations of your name.

related: Authors With Multiple Brands – Secrets to Managing Multiple Topics When Writing Articles

Comment provided March 20, 2009 at 6:05 PM

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6

Thanks for the great suggestion! And how simple to implement. I also appreciate the “bonus” tips on multiple topic submissions, since I’m shortly about to start writing for a second niche.

Comment provided March 20, 2009 at 6:17 PM

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7
David Quimby writes:

Fantastic idea. Good way of advertising your articles on E zine Articles. There are so many people that do not know that it exist. More exposure for your articles and E zine Articles. Which both could early use.

Comment provided March 21, 2009 at 7:23 AM

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8
cyramiles writes:

I really didn’t explore my twitter. Reading your post today compels me to start exploring this commonly used medium.

Cheers

Comment provided March 21, 2009 at 8:31 PM

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9
Lance Winslow writes:

Hmm, I had that thought the other day and then considered that maybe folks would not be so interested in my large array of topics. It seems it would be more appropriate for a niche oriented tweeter, than a generalist tweeting expert.

The reason I had thought about this is due to the character limits of tweeting and the headlines or article title lengths allowed. It’s amazing what you can write in 140 characters when you are forced to efficiently use those spaces. Too bad this did not exist a long time ago when computers first came out and space was at such a premium.

Does anyone out there feel that “tweeting” is somewhat silly and almost ridiculous? I mean some of the stuff people tweet about is just nonsense. I suppose if someone tweeted titles of articles they were going to come out with soon, within a few days, it would be of interest to their tweeting group, but then it could very well turn them off if they pre-announced too much. Some authors write way too many articles for that (no, not most article authors here) but some.

Many people swear by the “tweeting” experience, and yet, it makes almost no sense to me whatsoever, in most circumstances. It has value for some things obviously, but most people use it totally incorrectly. It seems the baby boomer generation thinks it’s stupid for the most part, although there are some in that generation that seem to be early adopters and folks that see value in it for particular uses. Others see it as a bunch of kids playing around on their mobile devices and put the whole thing in the “So What” category of human endeavors.

Not to be negative, but personally, although this “tweeting strategy” in this blog seems like an awfully good use for tweeting if one were to partake in such activities, but tweeting in and of itself appears to be a way to allow certain humans to feel self important. When in reality they should come to the realization that no one really cares what they tweet about and their friends only pretend to so that they will listen to their nonsense back at them.

Think on this.

Comment provided March 21, 2009 at 10:24 PM

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10

I will agree that a niche twitterer would find more traction amongst his or her followers on Twitter than someone who posted about 500-1000 different unrelated niche topics.

In fact, that just may be the answer as to why our own @EzineArticles account has more followers than my personal account @ChrisKnight – because our business account keeps a single-minded focus on article writing & marketing tips & activities whereas I cover everything that interests me personally from entrepreneurship to fitness to team building to gadgets to user experience & speed obsessions to conversion/split testing to sales/marketing/advertising & PR.

In fact, one could argue that our business twitter account is worth 10x more in value than my personal account even though the follower count is only 1.2x due to the focused nature of those who follow us… ie: They are expecting article writing & marketing tweets.

Comment provided March 22, 2009 at 2:53 PM

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11
Cheryl G Burke writes:

Super tips all ’round, Thanks

Comment provided March 23, 2009 at 4:57 PM

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12
----- writes:

Does anyone out there feel that ‚¬“tweeting‚¬ is somewhat silly and almost ridiculous? I mean some of the stuff people tweet about is just nonsense. I suppose if someone tweeted titles of articles they were going to come out with soon, within a few days, it would be of interest to their tweeting group, but then it could very well turn them off if they pre-announced too much. Some authors write way too many articles for that (no, not most article authors here) but some.

Many people swear by the ‚¬“tweeting‚¬ experience, and yet, it makes almost no sense to me whatsoever, in most circumstances. It has value for some things obviously, but most people use it totally incorrectly. It seems the baby boomer generation thinks it’s stupid for the most part, although there are some in that generation that seem to be early adopters and folks that see value in it for particular uses. Others see it as a bunch of kids playing around on their mobile devices and put the whole thing in the ‚¬“So What‚¬ category of human endeavors.

Comment provided March 24, 2009 at 11:43 AM

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13
Gail writes:

Being very new to Twitter at first it did seem that most of it was pure nonsense. I am not interested in if someone is having their lunch or how they got to work.However, I delved deeper, and if used properly it is great. I love that you have to say something relevant and direct someone to a more in depth article or web page in 140 characters.

You choose who to follow……….by ignoring the rubbish and only following those that are worthwhile…..hopefully will in time eliminate the rubbish.

So it is definitely useful if used correctly.

Comment provided March 29, 2009 at 9:05 PM

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14
DeAnna Troupe writes:

I’m cracking up as I’m reading this, because I did that with the last article that I submitted before I read this. Hmm. Maybe this could be my next article…Quick to the microphone away!(I podcast my ideas before I write them out).

Comment provided March 29, 2009 at 9:19 PM

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