Exclusive Defined

Because some authors are fuzzy about what the word “Exclusive” means when we say that you must have “an exclusive license or right to any article that you submit to us”… I thought I’d share the definition:

Princeton.edu defines “EXCLUSIVE” as:
“not divided or shared with others; “they have exclusive use of the machine”; “sole rights of publication””

We define “exclusive” as the fact that you have the sole rights of publication of the article.

An author today who we suspended for sending in articles that he didn’t have the exclusive rights to said something like:

“The article I submitted was a part of my ezine that I received when I signed up for a ‘work at home’ program online. I thought I had exclusive rights to reprint this newsletter online.”

This newbie article marketer has the classic case of English word mis-understanding. What he has is a “NON-exclusive” right to the articles. While this is not illegal, it just feels fraudulent whenever we are able to find any article that an author submitted published somewhere else on the net under a different authors name.

Better yet, send in ORIGINAL articles that you personally wrote.

:-)

2 Comments »


1
Lance Winslow writes:

Chris, I see you are going after this big time, I much applaud your efforts. I also realize that different industries use the word “exclusive” differently. Having been involved in franchising, we use the word different than the real estate industry and often when realestate law crosses franchise law it causes friction. Similarly, exclusive in entertainment, advertising and sports also have slightly different meanings. I like your new approach best. “Look, here is the deal, write your own articles” or better yet; “send in ORIGINAL articles that you personally wrote.”

If for some reason you cannot do that, pay someone who can to write them for you, with the stipulation that you have the “Exclusive”. What part of original do you not understand?

This site contains exclusive and original content for ezines, websites and publishers interested in the best articles. “Exclusive and Original Content” for the World.

Comment provided August 30, 2005 at 3:46 AM

[Reply]

2
Brian Baldwin writes:

I agree. Only send in stuff you wrote. I’ve seen places that sell content that you can claim you wrote and it seems wrong. Why would I attach my name to something I didn’t write and take the chance that someone will see 2 or more different authors on the same article?

Comment provided August 30, 2005 at 5:12 PM

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